A cornucopia of ideas: food for thought for digital education

A cornucopia

Keep an open mind Given the sudden shift to digital education that Covid19 has caused during the first half of 2020, we have now an opportunity to better understand digital education in order to prepare for autumn teaching. However, first we might want to appreciate and understand how much Covid19 has affected and continues to … Continue reading A cornucopia of ideas: food for thought for digital education

Banana Banana Bread

Before this wonderful banana bread gets lost to the Internet archives, I’d thought I’d share it by reposting it.

Banana Banana Bread

Adapted from AllRecipes.com

Ingredients

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 6 mashed medium overripe bananas

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Lightly grease a 9×5 inch loaf pan. (My 9×5 pan is currently scratched out of commission and so I used two 8×5 pans which you can also do, but I prefer the one big 9×5 loaf.)
  2. In a large bowl, combine flour, cinnamon, baking soda and salt. In a separate bowl, use an electric mixer to cream together butter and brown sugar. Stir in eggs and mashed bananas until well blended. Stir banana mixture into flour mixture; stir just to moisten, do not over-mix. Pour batter into prepared loaf pan.
  3. Bake in preheated oven for 60 to 65 minutes, until a toothpick inserted into center of the loaf comes out clean. Let bread cool in pan for 10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack.

Bread tastes even better the next day. To store, simply wait for it to cool completely and then wrap in plastic wrap.

Amandeleine

The first thing I ever made completely by myself (meaning my mom wasn’t allowed to help beyond answering the occasional question) was a chocolate chip banana bread. My high school sweetheart was a fan of the chocolate and banana combo and my mom made a mean chocolate chip banana muffin. I took her recipe and put all the dough in a loaf pan instead of a muffin pan.

For some reason I felt a single loaf was more romantic than a pile of muffins? Or something? I had this image in my head of a fresh loaf of bread in a basket. Why that couldn’t be muffins in a basket, I’m not entirely sure. But loaf. HAD to be loaf.

This switch to loaf made everything more stressful. If I had muffins I could have tested one with my boyfriend being none the wiser. With a loaf, stealing a slice…

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A great piece of research on mental health amongst English language teaching professionals

I recently participated in a study on mental health among English language teaching professionals. The findings have recently been released and I highly recommend that colleagues read the study and its results. Managers within ELT and EAP (English for academic purposes) might benefit from reading the results of the study. Mental health is a serious … Continue reading A great piece of research on mental health amongst English language teaching professionals

A defence of “political correctness” — Politics and Insights

  I think this article is well worth a read for those of any political persuasion. The author makes several well-supported points. Dialogue is crucial if we are to understand each other and anyone with a view different to ours. https://www.youtube.com/embed/Im5GzJLJD-A?version=3&rel=1&fs=1&autohide=2&showsearch=0&showinfo=1&iv_load_policy=1&wmode=transparent The left believe that in order to address prejudice and discrimination, it’s important to … Continue reading A defence of “political correctness” — Politics and Insights

Thoughts on ‘Why Believing in Your Students Matters’ by Katie Martin

Today I came across this succinct article by Katie Martin on why believing in our students matters, as this can have a significant impact upon a teacher's practices and students' uptake of learning regardless of where learning and teaching that takes place - whether face-to-face or online. While I have known about the need to wait for … Continue reading Thoughts on ‘Why Believing in Your Students Matters’ by Katie Martin

Ideas on teaching: should we abandon adherence to lesson aims?

Reflections on an article on Bakhtin & digital scholarship I've recently read an article from the Journal of Applied Social Theory called 'Bakhtin, digital scholarship and new publishing practices as carnival' which discusses how digital scholarship causes disruption to traditional academic practices (Cooper & Condie, 2016). The authors theorize the issues by using Mikhail Bakhtin's concepts on language and … Continue reading Ideas on teaching: should we abandon adherence to lesson aims?

Are we OK, you and I, after you voted to destroy my dreams? — Andrew Reid Wildman, artist, photographer, writer, teacher

Reflections on the EU referendum result I came across this moving post which was written as a result of the EU referendum that appears to be causing deep fissures across the UK to surface. Increasing numbers of reports are coming in of xenophobic and racial slurs being hurled against ordinary people going about their daily … Continue reading Are we OK, you and I, after you voted to destroy my dreams? — Andrew Reid Wildman, artist, photographer, writer, teacher